Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52www.MySummit.com 910 Clay Street • Rupert, WV 25984 or 114 James River and KanawhaTpke • Rainelle, WV 25962 EDUCATION The Greenbrier County Schools are the county’s second largest employer. If you factor in the faculties and staff at the two institutions of higher learning - the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine and New River Community and Technical College – and the staff at private schools and pre- schools, it is easy to see that education is one of Greenbrier County’s major industries. From 1875 to 1972 the Greenbrier Military School drew several thousand young men to the area. Similarly, from 1923 to 1972 the Greenbrier College for Women drew a similar number of young women. It’s fitting that the former campuses of these institutions live on, repurposed as a medi- cal school and a community college, contributing to the econ- omy and vibrancy of the region. AGRICULTURE Greenbrier County has a long agricultural history dating to its earliest days. Today the county has over 750 farms covering 177,000 acres, devoted primarily to beef, dairy cattle, turkey and sheep production. The county is the largest beef produc- er in West Virginia, with approximately 33,500 head of cattle. (By comparison, the county has 35,644 human residents, so we have nearly as many cows as people!) Greenbrier County also leads the state in hay production, with 53,000 acres. Aviagen Tur- keys is the pre- miere supplier of turkey breed- ing stock in the world. Aviagen operates 23 farms and two hatcheries in the Greenbrier Valley and provides jobs for over 180 people. The farm-to-table movement has given new life to the region’s small farms. The Greenbrier Valley Local Foods Initia- tive provides technical training for food and farm entrepreneurs and connects them with local-sourcing restaurants and farmers’ markets. Pick-your-own berry farms and cut-your-own Christmas tree farms also operate in the region. MANUFACTURING Several high tech companies are based or have operations in the Greenbrier Valley. ABB Process Analytics is a world leader in process gas chromatography, spectrophotometry, pH sen- sors, conductivity probes and transmitters, and Reid vapor pressure analyzers. Greenbrier Technical Services provides electronic, electromechanical and mechanical equipment parts. Appalachian Electronics produces optical, electronic, mechani- cal and chemical solutions for the textile, life sciences and hydro- carbon processing industries. UTC Aerospace Systems serves the aerospace and defense industries. American Foam Tech- nologies manufacture high-quality phenolic and urethane foam products. Gateway Industries offers assembly, packaging, ware- housing and distribution, while providing training and employ- ment for individuals with disabilities. Boxley Aggregates produces crushed stone and ag- ricultural lime for contractors, road builders and farming opera- tions. RBS supplies ready-mix concrete and concrete blocks for the building industry. Greenbrier County is home to three rapidly growing companies in the craft distilling and brewing industries, operat- ing in state-of-the-art facilities at the Greenbrier Valley Airport Greenbrier County has a long agricultural history dating to its earliest days. 30 | Greater Greenbrier Chamber of Commerce